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Only in New Zealand could you find a police station that looked so friendly and a playground of shadows, light and colour. I've been photographing window over the last ten years, and each time it seems to get better.
At a rented house with huge panes of panoramic glass that the little White Eyes would bash into, a view of the beach looking backwards from it. This is at Lang's Beach, Whangarei
With my back door open, a view of the neighbour's back yard past the clothes hanging to dry. I'm tempted to re-introduce the clothesline so I can work more of this shot.
Also at Lang's Beach in New Zealand's North Island, this is a view of the view looking out to sea as seen in the windows to the regenerating bush of manuka scrub.
In Cambridge, North Island, this is late afternoon from the deck of my sister in law's house.
One of the ever-engrossing, ever-changing sights are the views from our upper deck which opens onto a mini-forest, lit a million different ways, with as many magical moments.
This time the front of our deck - see how much can be shot from around the house? - but at a special little space of time when lights and shadows work together, the waltz of dark and light, cool and hot colours
Looking west from our upper deck, allowing all the strong horizontal lines to play at diagonals, with the wonderful painting inside by Charlotte Crowther echoing the trees outside.
Depth in this image comes from colours rather than perspective drawing as all the usual clues run into each other, and sharpness may not be where you expect to find it, creating a glassy sense of space.
Another view from our deck, this time looking north: this is possible because of sliding doors which are hinged in the middle, forming an angle in which light bounces around like a pinball trapped.
This, like others of our house, is arguably also a 'Homescape' as it brings together all the best things about such photography: you're always ready, yet you don't have to carry any kit around. Just be prepared to drop the knife and fork and leave the dinner table when you see something.
When light reflects off objects and is re-reflected, and possibly reflected again, it changes its quality, becoming softer with each pass. That's why New Zealand light is so wonderful to work with: starting very sharp, it stays sharp when reflected.
Only in New Zealand could you find a police station that looked so friendly and a playground of shadows, light and colour. I've been photographing window over the last ten years, and each time it seems to get better.
When light reflects off objects and is re-reflected, and possibly reflected again, it changes its quality, becoming softer with each pass. That's why New Zealand light is so wonderful to work with: starting very sharp, it stays sharp when reflected.
With the colour temperature rack up to make cool colours which isn't very much how it looked like, as this is a summer's late afternoon sun , but it works with the blue sky and dark jeans.
Don't you just love how light does all the work for you, and your job is simply to keep your eyes open and stay awake: don't let a picture slip past on your watch! Here is sunset in Devonport, Auckland: here one second, gone in about ten.